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I'm getting ready to have my pins produced and have some questions:

Margi at Pin Pros vs. Jeff at PinPromotions?  Heard great things about both.

I liked Jeff's digital proofs better -- they were clearer.  How close to the proof does the pin actually deliver?

Has anyone seen a photo-epoxy dome pin from Pin Pros?  Does anyone know which company did the Annointed Voice pin?  I can't read the backs of the pins, even with a magnifying glass.

Also, I have a longstanding paypal merchant account but have not used it in the last several years.  I can't remember -- does the money go into my bank directly or into a paypal account as a credit?

thanks for helping.  And a little prayer goes up for Jeff and PP.  I've got family in the way of Wilma, bless them too.

PS TO ARTQUEST:  The group/pin was "The Way We Make a Difference" for the Got Tickets? pin -- or you could also be referring to the Clay Pen pin, I think that is Pams Creative's website.  A donation to that website got you the ClayPen.

I looked through my stash very quickly and did not see a photo pin from Pin Pros, but I could easily have overlooked one. The Annointed Voice pin was done by National. RedJet used Jeff at Pin Promotions for her sketch pins. I did see several that were done by Lapel Pins and some by Pinz.

Let's see where to begin:

I've never worked with Pams Creative's, so I have no opinion. I've now worked with Jeff three times. I would work with him again, even though our history hasn't been smooth. The reason? He always came through. Always.

Sometimes it took a long time. From start to finish the Jukebox DVD pins took almost four months. First they had problems in manufacturing that necessitated making the pins again but making them bigger. Then they shipped but had been assembled incorrectly. So they made them again and shipped, and they turned out to be pretty amazing. The Holiday Gift Pins took four weeks, but then he said they would take three to four weeks. Both of these were hinged pins, which complicates and slows down the manufacturing process. The Great Balls of Fire pin process was flawless. In and out in less than ten days.

Jeff's pretty responsive, but you have to be prepared to stay in touch with him. It didn't work for me to wait for him to call or write. I found him always pleasant, though.

The proofs looked exactly like the pins. Except the pins are prettier.

Hope this helps.

And thanks for letting me know about The Way We Make a Difference pin.

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I'm interested in hearing from people when they get their Jukebox DVD pins. I'm also VERY interested if they DON'T arrive.

====================================================

artquest, I received the JBT DVD pins on10/25 and they are WONDERFUL!!!

Edited by clay4shore
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After I had responded to WhatWouldClayDo07 in the New Pin thread, she PM'ed me with a lot of questions about the process of getting some pins made. I told her it would take me some time to write something up for her, but that in the meantime she should read this thread because there is a lot of good information in it. A lot of people have learned things the hard way, and I would hate to see new designers make the same mistakes over again.

In thinking about what I was going to say, I thought it might be better to simply write a tutorial for her that could be posted for all wannabe pin designers to use. Much of the information that I would include is already here in this thread, but it would put it in a more organized format. So far, I have drafted an outline of what I think this tutorial should contain and it would include credits to whomever provided the information. I'm hoping to have a rough draft compiled by tonight and will post it for feedback. Here is my outline (subject to change!):

So You Want to Design a Pin – A Tutorial

I. Introduction

A. Getting started

B. Customer service

II. Pin Design

A. Types of Pins

1. Cloisonné

  a. Description

  b. Pros

  c. Cons

2. Die struck

  a. Description

  b. Pros

  c. Cons

3. Photo etched

  a. Description

  b. Pros

  c. Cons

4. Offset printed

  a. Description

  b. Pros

  c. Cons

B. Artwork Considerations

1. Size

2. Complexity

3. Photos

4. Text

III. Pricing, Selling, Ordering, and Shipping

A. Setting edition sizes

B. Setting prices

1. Pins

2. Shipping

3. Other fees

C. Collecting Money

1. Pre-orders

2. Paypal

   a. Types of accounts

  b. Setting up a store

3. Other

D. Tracking Information

1. Excel

2. Access

E. Shipping

1. Packing

2. Supplies

  a. Padded envelopes

  b. Bubble wrap

  c. Labels

  d. Postage

IV. Pin Companies

A. www.pinpromotions.com

1. Contact information

2. Some pins made by this company

3. Comments

B. www.pinmart.com

1. Contact information

2. Some pins made by this company

3. Comments

C. www.pinpros.com

1. Contact information

2. Some pins made by this company

3. Comments

D. www.dollarpins.com

1. Contact information

2. Some pins made by this company

3. Comments

E. etc., etc., etc.

V. Additional Comments

I figure this will be a work in progress - the first draft will definitely have some holes in it. I welcome any and all feedback on this!

ETA: This is taking longer than I thought - I will try and have something done this weekend!

Edited by cameocat
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The customer service part should definitely include some suggestions on ordering extra pins to cover damaged goods and replacements. The price of individual pins should include a little extra to cover this "cushion."

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And now for something different:

I have a bunch of defective Jukebox DVD pins. Over 800, in fact. Since the first batch of pins arrived with the "pages" in the wrong order, they've been sitting in the guest bathroom while I worked on getting the right pins to the right people.

Now that that's mostly done, I have to figure out what to do with these babies.

1. Throw them away?

2. Sell them for the cost of the shipping & handling (about $1.25 each as they're really heavy)

3. Sell them for more and donate the surplus (everything over $1.25) to the BAF or UNICEF or such?

4. Distribute only a limited edition, put a few on ebay and retire wealthy? (OK, maybe not that one . . .)

I don't want to dimish the value of the ones that were done correctly. Any suggestions?

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The customer service part should definitely include some suggestions on ordering extra pins to cover damaged goods and replacements.  The price of individual pins should include a little extra to cover this "cushion."

Definitely!

I think you should go ahead with option 2 or 3 with your "mistakes" - I'd buy some.

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Cameocat that is a great idea...do you want to start a whole new topic for it...so it will be easy to organize...

I think a lot of us can add things to it...

Artquest...I would seriously go with number 3...sell it for 3 dollars and give the profit to BAF or UNICEF...

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artquest, I just read several posts over in the Clackhouse's pin forum advising you to dump the defective pins. That is the only place I've seen that happening. I don't recognize any of those posters as well-known collectors, so I'm hoping you will listen more to the collectors here and at the Clayboard who want the pins. I'd hate to see the pins being thrown away.
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I'm getting ready to have my pins produced and have some questions:

Margi at Pin Pros vs. Jeff at PinPromotions? Heard great things about both.

I've worked with both, and have been happy with the products I received from both. I had shipping "issues" with the first pin I did with each of them.....and both were great at resolving the problem promptly. Pin Pros gives an extra 5% discount to designers doing Clay pins.

I've become friends with Margi and appreciate that she is a Claymate.....Jeff (to me) is just a businessman.....So, I've been giving my business to Pin Pros.

I would like to add.....on a slightly different topic.....that I would probably never do a photo dome pin again.

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Thanks to Cameocat, who was cr....generous enough to offer to organize the information shared on the ABC's of selling Clay pins...If anyone has anything to add or want anything changed in her tutorial please pm Cameocat or me.

Ansa

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So You Want to Design a Pin – A Tutorial

Getting started

Got an idea for a pin? Wonderful! This tutorial will offer you information and guidance on the process of designing, ordering, and selling your own pin design. Just remember, good preparation, organization, and communication will make the process much easier and more enjoyable for you.

If you are minor, please partner with a responsible adult to supervise the process of selling your pins. This tutorial is meant to be used by you who are new to this process in hopes you can be better prepared and take advantage of lessons learned by those who have already been through it.

Many thanks go out to all who have shared their experiences in various threads and on various boards on the designing, selling, trading, and shipping of pins – your contributions are highly valued and very helpful in making this tutorial compilation possible.

Customer service

Everyone knows you are a Clay fan and the people buying your pins are all Clay fans, but it’s important to remember that you are actually conducting individual business transactions with many customers. Each and every customer expects to receive goods for money tendered. Therefore, you need to be prepared to replace pins lost or damaged in the mail.

Good communication is vitally important, and there is no such thing as too much communication. Let your customers know when you expect to get the pins and when you expect to ship them out. If you encounter production delays or changes with the pin company, let your customers know that, too. If you receive questions via email or PM, show courtesy by answering them in a timely fashion.

Copywrites and Trademarks

If you are using a photograph in your design, you must make sure you get permission from the photographer to use it. It does not matter if the photographer is a professional, amateur, or just a fan – if he/she took it, he/she owns it, and only he/she can give you permission to use it. If you are unable to obtain permission, you should find another photograph that you do have permission to use. If you don't know who took a particular photo, post it on some of the boards and ask!

The same also applies to trademarked images and drawings. Also, it does not matter if you are designing a pin to sell at cost, to sell as a charity fundraiser, or for trade only – get permission from the photographer to use any photo or part of a photo before taking any orders.

Pin Design

There are several types of lapel pins that you can choose from for your design. The following descriptions were copied, combined, and somewhat paraphrased from the websites of several pin companies, including Pin Pros and Pin Promotions.

Cloisonné

Authentic cloisonné pins have been made by Chinese artists for centuries. The methods used hundreds of years ago are still used today. Pins are made from a die and each color is injected into a recessed area or "canal." The pin is baked between every color. After all colors are applied, the pin is polished. Cloisonné pins have a very limited number of colors. Because of this, along with the high cost to produce authentic cloisonné, these pins are rarely made today. Instead, most customers choose hard enamel cloisonné.

Examples:

None known

Hard Enamel Cloisonné

Hard enamel cloisonné pins are the new cloisonné pins. Hard enamel pins have metal lines around the text and graphics. These lines hold the enamel. Sometimes, lines can be raised to create text or graphics. Also called Epola, New Cloisonné, Clois-Tech, Cloisonné II and Semi-Cloisonné, these pins have been around for about two decades. Cloisonné can only use a handful of colors, but hard enamel cloisonné pins can have over 1,000 colors used in the making of the pin. Hard enamel cloisonné pins are also cheaper to make and offer a faster turnaround time. For these reasons, most customers that need cloisonné pins, choose hard enamel cloisonné. Only an expert can tell the difference between cloisonné and hard enamel cloisonné lapel pins.

Many lapel pin companies do not distinguish between authentic cloisonné and hard enamel cloisonné pins. They call hard enamel cloisonné pins cloisonné when actually they are not. One way to tell the difference is the colors offered. Authentic cloisonné only has about 120 colors from which to choose. If a pin company says they'll match to any of the industry standard colors from a color guide, it's not really an authentic cloisonné lapel pin.

Examples:

When Doves Cry

Ambassador Of Love

Soft Enamel

The soft enamel style is the most popular type of custom made lapel pin because it offers brilliant colors and raised metal detailing. These lapel pins are similar to hard-enamel but the edges between the colors are not as smooth. The die is made similar to cloisonné. Soft enamel is used when cost is a factor or fine detail is not needed. Sometimes, an epoxy dome is added to the pin to prevent scratching. The process begins by die striking your design into iron or copper. Then it is plated to your specified color. Soft enamel pins are frequently used for sport pins, corporate pins and other types of lapel pins.

Examples:

Brazil

Clay-Trippers

Die Struck

A die is used to stamp an impression onto a copper or iron sheet. Copper has a slight advantage over iron since it is a softer metal. This means when struck with the die, copper lapel pins typically have sharper images than their iron counterparts.

Examples:

Use Your Voice

Listen To Your Heart

Gain From Giving

What Women Want

Photo-etched/Silk-screened/Offset Printed

The process of photo-etching, silk-screening, or offset printing a lapel pin allows special logos to be used without the need for the fine gold or silver metal line around each color on the pin. An image of your design is transferred from a photographic negative onto the surface of the metal. Your design is then etched into the metal using an acid-reaction process. All the acids and other impurities are carefully rinsed off. The indentations are then filled with the enamel colors. Colors are inserted by hand, one at a time, using different sized syringes. The sheet of metal is then fired at 450°F for 12 to 15 minutes. Pins are then cut out of the sheet according to your custom design. Non-colored (raised) sections of the pin are then plated to a shiny gold finish. An optional epoxy protective coating (dome) can then be applied to protect the color enamels from fading or cracking over time and to make the pins more attractive and thicker.

Examples:

Clay Dawgs

Clay Dawgs Christmas

Photo-Dome

Photo-dome pins might be the way to go if your original art has color gradients or you do not wish to have the thin metal lines separating the colors and text. These pins are created by printing your art on paper and then applying the paper to a thin metal pin. Epoxy is placed on top of the paper. The pin will be an exact reproduction of your art.

Examples:

CA Chicks For Clay

Nap 2005

No Clack For You

Design Considerations

You can choose a combination of pin types if your design warrants it, such as a die struck pin with enamel accents. You can also make hinged pins or have 3D elements of the pin attached on springs. If you do design a hinged pin, be aware that they do add a great deal of complexity and time to the production. Hinges can be easily broken if not designed well or properly packaged when shipped. Loops or holes can be added so that the pin can double as an ornament or pendant. Dangles and chains can be added as well. Some designers also make non-pin items such as key chains, pendants, and ornaments.

Choosing the appropriate size of your pin will depend on the complexity of your design, the effect you wish to achieve, and the cost. Some collectors like small pins and some like large ones. Some like simple shapes and some like fancy cutout shapes. Some like text and some don’t.

If there is a lot of detail or text, you should go with a larger size pin to improve legibility, or simplify your design to improve visual impact. Typically, pins are made in the range of ¾” to 1 ½” in size. However, there are some very large pins that go up to 2” or so.

It is a good idea to review all of the other designs shown in the Pin Gallery so that you are not inadvertently designing one that is similar to an existing pin. Do try to be different and unique! If your design is too similar to an existing pin, you run the risk of infringing upon that designer’s copywrite. With so many pins out there now, if your design is a poor one or just doesn’t grab people’s attention, it probably won’t sell well.

Your website or fan group’s URL (or something else) can be put on the back of the pin instead of the phone number of the pin company. Pins can also be numbered, especially if they are a limited edition.

Pricing, Selling, Ordering, and Shipping

Setting Edition Sizes

Typically, the minimum number of pins that you can order is 100. The price per pin will drop with each additional 100 ordered – the more pins ordered, the cheaper the pins are individually. Sometimes designers will limit orders to a specific amount such as 100, 150, or 200. These days, most pins are selling anywhere from 100-300 or so. Some designers will take pre-orders via email before taking any money to try and gauge how many pins will be purchased in order to set the appropriate price.

Setting Prices

Selling pins and other items with Clay Aiken’s image for personal profit is simply not condoned. So far, Team Clay is looking the other way in all this, probably because most designers are making pins at cost, out of love and camaraderie for Clay and his fans.

Prices should be set to cover all the expected costs of the pins, shipping supplies, postage, Paypal fees, etc. No one expects you to take a loss in this venture. Most sellers that do end up with a modest profit donate it to a known charity. If you are using the pin as charity fundraiser, do share that information with your buyers upfront and indicate how much will be donated.

Collecting Money

There are two basic ways to go about collecting money. One, you can front the cost yourself, order the pins from the company, and then just sell or trade them. Two, you can accept payments from buyers before ordering the pins from the company. Most people use the second method, as it can be prohibitively expensive to front the cost yourself, with no guarantees that you will sell enough pins to recoup your costs.

Most sellers accept Paypal as the preferred method of payment. A few might only have Personal Accounts which cannot accept credit cards or debit cards. Personal Accounts are limited in how much money can be received within a one month timeframe. You are much better off with a Premier or Business Account; however, Paypal charges a fee for all moneys received. For U.S. citizens, the cost is 2.9% (3.9% for international buyers) plus $0.30. Make sure you account for this cost in setting your prices.

Some sellers set up an online store with an electronic shopping cart to handle the orders for them. Others simply post their Paypal email address and cost information. Paypal allows you to download the order information into an Excel spreadsheet.

Tracking Information

It is vital to keep good records of your orders. You can do this with a spreadsheet program such as MS Excel or a database such as MS Access.

Shipping

Pins should always be shipped in padded envelopes. Some people even wrap the pins in bubble wrap before putting them in the padded envelopes. There have been many reports of pins being shipping in plain envelopes and being totally mangled by the Post Office. Pack the pins well and don’t take any chances. Also, don’t forget to fill out the custom forms if shipping pins out of the country.

Padded Envelopes

Here are some sources for padded envelopes:

www.uline.com

www.ESupplyStore.com

www.ebay.com (type in bubble mailers and boom!)

stores.ebay.com/EPACKNGO

Labels

If you have properly set up a database or spreadsheet with addresses, you can use them to print off labels. Always do a test print on plain paper to verify the placement of printing on the label sheets.

Pin Companies

Here is a listing of some of the companies that have been used to produce Clay related pins. You can search online for other companies that make custom lapel pins as well.

Dollar Pins

www.dollarpins.com

Contact: Laura (say Dianna of Clay Train Connection sent you)

Phone Number: 563-927-3179

Example pins made by this company:

Clay Train

Comments:

Based in Iowa. Dianna had her pins within 7 business days. Free shipping.

Pin Mart

www.pinmart.com

Example pins made by this company:

2004 Maine Pre-Party

Comments:

This company was fine to work with and had reasonable prices. Pins were received sooner than expected.

Pin Promotions

www.pinpromotions.com

Contact: Jeff York

Phone Number: 1-800-264-3923

Example pins made by this company:

RedJet pins and ornaments

Clackhouse hinged Jukebox/DVD

Comments:

This company has made the majority of the Clay related pins out there. There have been some production problems, but they were always addressed.

Pin Pros

www.pinpros.com

Pin Pros offering a 5% discount to Clay fans

email: Margi@pinpros.com

Example pins made by this company:

Hooked on Pins

CA Dangles

Faithful Fans

Comments:

Margi is a fan who posts at the Clayboard. They are good to work with and some designers report good results with artist proofs.

Pinz

pinz.tomskot.com

Contact: Gary Anderson

Example pins made by this company:

Delaware

Clay-liens

Comments:

This company is smaller with good prices and good individualized attention.

(other companies coming soon)

Additional Tips and Comments

(coming soon)

Edited by cameocat
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I've posted my first attempt at a pin design and selling tutorial for beginners. I would definitely like some feedback, specifically on these areas:

1. I posted everything in one post - does this seem okay, or should I break it up into separate posts?

2. I do have very definite opinions on the use of copywrited images and photographs, but I toned down my initial thoughts to try and reflect the prevailing views. Let me know if I've gone overboard or not, or if I should expand upon it.

3. I also have very definite opinions on selling pins for profit. I toned down my intial thoughts here as well. Let me know if I've gone overboard or not, or if I should expand upon it.

There are areas that I do want to expand upon, but I wanted to get the basics up as quickly as possible. I did note the areas that were not yet complete, but some other areas I wanted to expand upon are the Paypal, tracking, and shipping sections.

Am I missing anything obvious? Is it too wordy or too brief in areas? Does it make sense? Is it helpful enough?

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Cameocat...I really like it great job!

About the copywright...I think you used the right tone. This is the right way to go about it. If the pinmakers decide to take a shortcut it is up to them at least we adviced them to take the straight route.

Same with the issue of doing it for profit. Its better to try discourage this...we know that not everybody will follow.

I do think we should give tips on how to find photographers of photos. I understand how people can become lax in recording the name of photographers in their files. I know before I got involved in making websites I just used to save pictures without taking note of source...so maybe we can add that if they don;t know the photographer, posting an inquiry in the boards may get them the info they need.

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I appreciate that the work you put into advising the pin makers.

I still find an open issue about the use of non-fan pictures. I still see several published pictures among the pins being sold. I know it is not my job to question this, but I do wonder if anyone will mention this to the people or will a hammer suddenly be dropped when someone notices this is being done?

For example,

the Rolling Stone picture redrawn, but recognizable

the SNL picture

the Wire image McDonalds picture (although the pin seller said she would use another picture, that is still the one selling the pin

The hands picture

The TVGuide picture.

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cameocat....I think you did a wonderful job on the "Tips" to pin designers/creators. It is a great starting point for anyone interested in entering the "fun"!!

Have we determined anything about screen caps? Or foreign press photos? I have started working on a pin using a sketch based on one of the Banda Aceh photos. I believe the picture has been shown on many of the entertainment shows and on a foreign website when Clay was there. Its from one of the pictures of Clay with the kids (but only Clay is used in the sketch). I will not be selling this pin, but using it as a trade only pin. Your thoughts??

This was posted at the Clayboard by alliicat....... about "fair use" of a work

  The purpose and character of the use:

Is the new work merely a copy of the original? If it is simply a copy, it is not as likely to be considered fair use.

Does the new work offer something above and beyond the original? Does it transform the original work in some way? If the work is altered significantly, used for another purpose, appeals to a different audience, it more likely to be considered fair use.

Is the use of the copyrighted work for nonprofit or educational purposes? The use of copyrighted works for nonprofit or educational purposes is more likely to be considered fair use.

The nature of the copyrighted work:

Is the copyrighted work a published or unpublished works? Unpublished works are less likely to be considered fair use.

Is the copyrighted work out of print? If it is, it is more likely to be considered fair use.

Is the work factual or artistic? The more a work tends toward artistic expression, the less likely it will be considered fair use.

The amount and substantiality of the portion used:

The more you use, the less likely it will be considered fair use.

Does the amount you use exceed a reasonable expectation? If it approaches 50 percent of the entire work, it is likely to be considered an unfair use of the copyrighted work.

Is the particular portion used likely to adversely affect the author's economic gain? If you use the "heart" or "essence" of a work, it is less likely your use will be considered fair.

The effect of use on the potential market for the copyrighted work:

The more the new work differs from the original, the less likely it will be considered an infringement.

Does the work appeal to the same audience as the original? If the answer is yes, it will likely be considered an infringement.

Does the new work contain anything original? If it does, it is more likely the use of the copyrighted material will be seen as fair use.

Edited by WNYClayFan
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Here's a problem I'm running into with the gift box pin. I chose the metal clutches instead of the usual rubber ones because I thought they would blend in better if folks hung them on the tree. Now I'm finding out that these metal backs tear the heck out of my plastic bubble wrap envelopes. I've had more comments on damaged pins and ripped envelopes than with anything else I've done. In fact, I got a pin back in the mail today, and the envelope is punctured in a lot of places.

I've taken to double wrapping the wait list and replacement pins in extra bubble wrap. Plus, I don't think I'll use these metal backs if I ever do pins again.

Did anyone else have this problem or were you all smart enough to use the rubber backs?

Edited by artquest
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Here's a problem I'm running into with the gift box pin.  I chose the metal clutches instead of the usual rubber ones because I thought they would blend in better if folks hung them on the tree.  Now I'm finding out that these metal backs tear the heck out of my plastic bubble wrap envelopes.  I've had more comments on damaged pins and ripped envelopes than with anything else I've done.  In fact, I got a pin back in the mail today, and the envelope is punctured in a lot of places.

I've taken to double wrapping the wait list and replacement pins in extra bubble wrap.  Plus, I don't think I'll use these metal backs if I ever do pins again. 

Did anyone else have this problem or were you all smart enough to use the rubber backs?

Personally, I hate the rubber backs with a fiery passion, as they are simply not secure enough to hold the pins in place when I wear them. I've almost lost several pins because of them, which prompted me to go to a craft store and buy butterfly clutch replacements. As far a shipping goes, I realize it is a lot of extra work to individually wrap the pins before putting them in a padded envelope, especially for those sending out hundreds of them. However, I always bubble wrap my pins whenever I mail out a trade or sale, and wish everyone else would do the same.

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Hello!

Complete pin-making newbie here. First, let me say thank you for the site. So much info in one place - how awesome! I read cameocat's tutorial, and it is full of great info - thank you!

I'm hoping that somebody will take pity on me an answer a couple questions. I did my design in two colours, but I only want to order one - what would you suggest is the best way to get feedback on them. A poll? I do have a small pph board that I could set one up on. I submitted the design to Pin Productions, and have the proofs for both.

Second, the paypal issue. I have a personal account, and really don't want to set up a business account. Am I underestimating the usage? At this point I am only considering 100 pins - a one time deal. I am Canadian, and the thought of cross border mailing gives me nightmares... trust me, it's MUCH easier for you to send here than vice versa. I do have a buddy in NC who would handle the shipping from there.

My pin is based on a professional photo, but stylized, and I'm hoping that it falls under the scope of the info that allicat posted.

If this is in the wrong place, I apologize and would ask to be pointed in the right direction. Thanks in advance.

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Hello!

Complete pin-making newbie here.  First, let me say thank you for the site. So much info in one place - how awesome! I read cameocat's  tutorial, and it is full of great info - thank you!

I'm hoping that somebody will take pity on me an answer a couple questions. I did my design in two colours, but I only want to order one - what would you suggest is the best way to get feedback on them. A poll? I do have a small pph board that I could set one up on. I submitted the design to Pin Productions, and have the proofs for both.

Second, the paypal issue. I have a personal account, and really don't want to set up a business account. Am I underestimating the usage? At this point I am only considering 100 pins - a one time deal. I am Canadian, and the thought of cross border mailing gives me nightmares... trust me, it's MUCH easier for you to send here than vice versa. I do have a buddy in NC who would handle the shipping from there.

My pin is based on a professional photo, but stylized, and I'm hoping that it falls under the scope of the info that allicat posted.

If this is in the wrong place, I apologize and would ask to be pointed in the right direction. Thanks in advance.

I'm glad you found the tutorial helpful! Personal accounts with Paypal do have monthly receiving limit of $500.00. You should be okay so long as the total cost per pin is $5.00 or less (including shipping) for up to 100 pins. Any more than that, you will need to upgrade your account, or require people to pay via check or money order. This is all assuming you're not receiving any money for eBay auctions or other sales during that time frame.

Regarding your design, I would just post your pictures in the "New Pins" thread in this forum and simply ask for feedback. I would also be explicit on just what you want feedback on, i.e. the color, or else you'll get all kinds of redesign feedback. :rolleyes:

Good luck!

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Great info cameocat...didn;t know that about paypal...

tip on getting feedback on design. I found that although it is great to get feedback...sometimes it's difficult to listen to a lot of people. I would suggest you show it to a small group of friends..posting it here is good too since we are not such a big group. Just remember in the end, you are the designer and you have to trust in your vision. I find that feedback helps when the design has not jelled but once I am in love with the design...that's it.

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Actually, now that I think about it, the $500 receiving limit is supposed to reset on the anniversary of the day of the month you opened your Personal Account. So, if you work it right, you could receive up to $1000 within in a calendar month. In other words, if you joined on the 15th of the month, your receiving limit gets reset on the 15th of every month. Here's a time frame scenario:

Let's say you want to allow sales for up to $1000 for two weeks:

Nov. 15th - your receiving limit is reset to $500

Nov. 15th-Dec 7th - nothing happens, you receive no money from sales

Dec. 8th-14th - you receive up to $500 in sales

Dec. 15th - your receiving limit is reset to $500

Dec. 15th-21st - you recieve up to $500 in sales

Dec. 22nd-Jan. 14th - you can't receive any more money in sales until your limit resets on Jan. 15th

I think this is how it works, anyway. :D

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