S.O.L.

Jeffrey Deaver and other favorite authors

Recommended Posts

I just finished reading a book this week for my book discussion group at my library that I found very profound and thought-provoking. It's called The Water and the Blood by Nancy Turner. Set in a small town in Texas right before WWII breaks out. The gist of the book is that the main character is a misfit in her family, her church and her town. She just doesn't fit anywhere. She finds solace at the small black church, which she sneaks out to on Sunday mornings. The sign says "All Welcome" and she takes it literally. Eventually she's 'outed' by a member of that church and ostracized by her family and community. As revenge, she stands silently by while a group of white high school friends burn down the black church, not knowing that there was a man inside. Even when it is discovered that it was murder, rather than 'just' arson, most of the people in town don't care.

She finally escapes her dismal lifestyle by going to California to work in the munitions plants to support the war effort (a la Rosie the Riveter). In California she fits in, makes friends and falls in love with a Navajo codetalker who was wounded in the Pacific theater, therein experiencing a whole new type of prejudice - that of a biracial couple. She returns home with him, giving her town and family a whole new reason to ostracize her.

The book is a study in prejudice - racial, religious and social. It's well written, though slow to get started. But the situations aren't gratuitous, like "Oh, let's throw in an abusive mother to keep it interesting". It all plays out very well and is believable. The characters are believable, with the exception of the mother, whom I found to be rather a caricature. Another thing liked was that it didn't end with everything all tied up in a neat little bow, with the bad guys all getting their just rewards and everyone living happily ever after. It was real. I was left with a sense of having learned something important. My book discussion group had an animated 90 minute discussion about this book.

Has anyone else read this? If so, I'd love to hear your thoughts on it.

Edited by Bookwhore

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That book sounds interesting bookwhore. I need to get back into reading. Maybe I'll start with a library card heh.

But that one is definitely on my list. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another Stephen King fan here! The Stand is my absolute favorite book...I have probably read it at least 3 times! I am one of those that as soon as I get his latest book, I have to sit and read it until I am finished.

Just finished Blaze...I enjoyed this one, much more than his last one Cell. Did you notice that the protaganist in the last two books was named Clay? I love it when fandoms collide. Loved The Dark Tower Series; although I have to say I was a little disappointed in the ending at first read, until I really thought about it and then it made sense.

Best SK movies...Stand By Me, The Shawshank Redemption. Never liked The Shining with Jack Nicholson and Shelley Duvall...totally bad casting and Nicholson was too crazy from the beginning; the character was supposed to descend into madness and I didn't get that from the movie. Also hated the mini-series IT; again bad casting...seems they went for name recognition instead of staying true to character...John Ritter as Ben? I think his books are really hard to transfer to the screen because they just cannot be condensed into a couple of hours and so much is lost.

He has a new one coming out January, 08...I am looking forward to that.

Kim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Memory Keepers's Daughter by Kim Edwards is an excellent read.

This stunning novel begins on a winter night in 1964, when a blizzard forces Dr. David Henry to deliver his own twins.

His son, born first, is perfectly healthy, but the doctor immediately recognizes that his daughter has Down syndrome. For motives he tells himself are good, he makes a split-second decision that will haunt all their lives forever. He asks his nurse, Caroline, to take the baby away to an institution. Instead, she disappears into another city to raise the child as her own. Compulsively readable and deeply moving, The Memory Keeper's Daughter is a brilliantly crafted story of parallel lives, familial secrets, and the redemptive power of love.

.

http://www.memorykeepersdaughter.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bookwhore...as you know I read that book. But even tho' I remember liking it and the general story I don't remember enough to give you any of my thoughts on it. *g*

---

For the dog lover's out there...I recomend the Bedlam Farm books by Jon Katz.

http://www.bedlamfarm.com/bedlam_books.asp

A dog year, The dog's of Bedlam Farm, A good dog and Dog days.

They are making the first into a movie right now...starring Jeff Bridges. I can't wait.

Edited by jamar1700

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's ok JaMar. You're allowed an occassional memory lapse. Lord knows I have my share. *g*.

Beenthinking, I read The Memory Keepers Daughter recently. One thing that kept me from enjoying it as much as others is that I couldn't get past my anger at the father. Yes, I apparently hold a grudge. One thing I did like about the story is that the daughter with the mental disability turned out to the the happiest one of the bunch. I'm not saying that it was a good thing, but the family that had the money, social standing, 'perfect' child, etc. turned out to be a pretty miserable bunch, and the family with the disabled child ended up being pretty well content and had a satisfying life.

It left me wondering 'who's the normal one'? I'm sure you've heard the saying "God don't make no mistakes". Made me think that maybe when I die and meet my Maker, is he going to say, "No, you're the one that didn't turn out right"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished a book this afternoon that came to me so highly recommended I had to read it, even though the premise of the book didn't sound at all like anything I'd be interested in. It's called Water for Elephants by Sara Groen.

This is the most accurate and concise Amazon review, IMO:

"The main character is a cantankerous, still-sharp 93-year-old man, and his frustration at being trapped in an old man's body is palpable. The story of his incredible life and adventures with the Benzini Brothers circus unfolds in a way that is emotionally wrenching, and yet flashes of good humor pervade throughout. The characters are richly drawn, and even the animals are given complex personalities that make them a pivotal part of the story. There is something in the novel for everyone: it is equal parts adventure, mystery, fictional memoir, love story, and historical account.

It's obvious that the author did her research into the time period (post-Depression America), and the subject matter (traveling circuses). According to the author's note at the end of the book, many of the compelling anecdotes in the story were based upon real events, culled from the diaries and personal histories of old-time circus performers."

I honestly admit that I never once sat around thinkg "Gee, I wish I knew more about the circus culture of the 1930's". But this is a really interesting book, a good story and a fast read. I'd give it 4 of 5 stars.

Has anyone else read it? What did you think?

Edited by Bookwhore

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's called Water for Elephants by Sara Groen. That is definitely on my list of books to read. I was looking at it when I was at Border's.

I love books. Anyone like the smell of new books? Everytime I go into a bookstore it is like inhaling a wonderful perfume...LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That's ok JaMar. You're allowed an occassional memory lapse. Lord knows I have my share. *g*.

Beenthinking, I read The Memory Keepers Daughter recently. One thing that kept me from enjoying it as much as others is that I couldn't get past my anger at the father. Yes, I apparently hold a grudge. One thing I did like about the story is that the daughter with the mental disability turned out to the the happiest one of the bunch. I'm not saying that it was a good thing, but the family that had the money, social standing, 'perfect' child, etc. turned out to be a pretty miserable bunch, and the family with the disabled child ended up being pretty well content and had a satisfying life.

It left me wondering 'who's the normal one'? I'm sure you've heard the saying "God don't make no mistakes". Made me think that maybe when I die and meet my Maker, is he going to say, "No, you're the one that didn't turn out right"?

Oh I want to check this out. I do have a daughter with DS...hee the old timers around here knows this cos I love telling Caitlin stories. But for the newbies, Cait just turned 7 and is in 2nd grade. She still barely talks and still wears diapers...BUT she is my joy. Yes we are constantly in celebration mode because it is wonderful to watch her learning and just interacting with the world. To her the world is her play ground. she can find hours of fun playing with a piece of kleenex and we find so many things to celebrate in her little triumphs. I certainly can;t fathom giving my little girl up...but I can totally see how the family that had her will end up happy and satisfied and feeling blessed.

I used to love reading too but two things made it me read less...Clay and Caitlin. Clay because I spend lots of time on the net and Ciat because she wakes up when I turn the reading light on and every time I sit and read she climbs in my lap and wants to play with the book. Then I discovered audiobooks and torrents and the ipod. Now I can do my chores and play with cait or take a walk or listen to the book just before sleeping.

The last book I really read...because I had a flu so I had lots of time by myslef was Life of Pi. What a great book that really kepy my attention while reading and even beyond. One book that I just finished listening to that I found really so over the top was Dan Brown's deception point. I loved Angel and Demon and enjoyed Da Vinci code...but Deception Point...totally hard to swallow.

I am a huge Stephen King fan. I am the type that falls in love with an author and ends up looking for all their work. Thanks for letting me know about Blaze I just downloaded the audio book. I also finished Liseys story...that I enjoyed immensely

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Toots
It's called Water for Elephants by Sara Groen. That is definitely on my list of books to read. I was looking at it when I was at Border's.

I love books. Anyone like the smell of new books? Everytime I go into a bookstore it is like inhaling a wonderful perfume...LOL

I love books too, have my whole life.

My other passion is fabric and like books, I just love to touch. I work 1 day a week as a volunteer in a library. It's so much fun just to gaze on all those wonderful books. Of course with no pay comes no responsibility so it's all good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't really revel in the smell of new books (some types of ink stink to high heaven!) as much as I do in the feel of new books. I hate to hold cheap books. I like running my fingertip down the page of a quality book made with higher quality paper and sturdy bindings. Touching cheap paper made from grade ZZZ paper with chunks of wood still in the pulp just sets my teeth on edge. :cryingwlaughter: When I read I usually hold the book very carefully so I don't crease the spine. My favorite books, the ones I know I'm going to read over and over again, I splurge and buy a finer edition.

Yes, I am a nerd. Anyone got a problem with that??

ETA: Toots, **high five** Good on you for volunteering at your library! We need people like you. :)

Edited by Bookwhore

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Toots
I don't really revel in the smell of new books (some types of ink stink to high heaven!) as much as I do in the feel of new books. I hate to hold cheap books. I like running my fingertip down the page of a quality book made with higher quality paper and sturdy bindings. Touching cheap paper made from grade ZZZ paper with chunks of wood still in the pulp just sets my teeth on edge. :cryingwlaughter: When I read I usually hold the book very carefully so I don't crease the spine. My favorite books, the ones I know I'm going to read over and over again, I splurge and buy a finer edition.

Yes, I am a nerd. Anyone got a problem with that??

ETA: Toots, **high five** Good on you for volunteering at your library! We need people like you. :)

Maybe you should write fanfic about books. I got turned on just reading your description of book foreplay. Wow, you could give Muski a run for her money!

:hubbahubba:

Thanks Bookwhore, I love doing it...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Part of my job at the library is opening the boxes of books and checking them in...I love it! It is like Christmas every day to me! I could probably get it done in half the time it takes me if I didn't stand there looking over every book; have to read the jacket flap; open it up; check out the back cover...I have even been known to read a chapter in the midst of unpacking!

Kim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That's ok JaMar. You're allowed an occassional memory lapse. Lord knows I have my share. *g*.

Beenthinking, I read The Memory Keepers Daughter recently. One thing that kept me from enjoying it as much as others is that I couldn't get past my anger at the father. Yes, I apparently hold a grudge. One thing I did like about the story is that the daughter with the mental disability turned out to the the happiest one of the bunch. I'm not saying that it was a good thing, but the family that had the money, social standing, 'perfect' child, etc. turned out to be a pretty miserable bunch, and the family with the disabled child ended up being pretty well content and had a satisfying life.

It left me wondering 'who's the normal one'? I'm sure you've heard the saying "God don't make no mistakes". Made me think that maybe when I die and meet my Maker, is he going to say, "No, you're the one that didn't turn out right"?

Hee...I was listening to the authors intro for Blaze...thanks for the reco btw...and it was king himself and he was talking about his trunk book making him think of certain books...and he mention the memory keepers daughter...that when he reads these books he think so bring on the blind person or the cancer...meaning they can get melodramatic. It really surprised me since we just mentioned it here...hee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Toots
Ansa, thank you for telling we newbies about your little daughter. What a lucky little girl she is to have you for her mother. You are very special, no wonder you like Clay.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bookwhore

I don't really revel in the smell of new books (some types of ink stink to high heaven!) as much as I do in the feel of new books.

LOL... I wasn't referring to the smell of new books themselves, but the smell of a collection of books when one walks into a new bookstore like, Borders, Barnes/Nobel, etc.

When I walk into my local library it doesn't smell like the bookstores. Does anyone understand my mutterings here... :cryingwlaughter:

One of the books I will be reading after Memory Keepers Daughter is:

The Judas Strain by James Rollings

From the depths of the Indian Ocean, a horrific plague has arisen to devastate humankind—a disease that's unknown, unstoppable . . . and deadly. But it is merely a harbinger of the doom that is to follow.

Aboard a cruise liner transformed into a makeshift hospital, Dr. Lisa Cummings and Monk Kokkalis—operatives of the shadowy covert organization SIGMA Force—search for answers to the bizarre affliction that has inexplicably washed ashore. But there are others with far less altruistic intentions. In a savage and sudden coup, terrorists hijack the vessel, turning a mercy ship into a floating bio-weapons lab.

At a Fourth of July celebration a world away, SIGMA's commander Gray Pierce thwarts the murderous schemes of a beautiful assassin—a would-be killer who holds the first clue to the discovery of a possible cure. With the fate of every man, woman, and child on Earth hanging in the balance, Pierce joins forces with the woman who wanted him dead, and together they embark upon an astonishing quest—one that winds through Venetian tombs, Byzantine cathedrals, and jungle-encrusted ruins—following the trail of the most fabled explorer in history: Marco Polo.

But time is an enemy as a worldwide pandemic grows rapidly out of control. And as a relentless madman dogs their every step, Pierce and his unlikely ally are being pulled into an astonishing mystery buried deep in antiquity and in humanity's genetic code. And as the seconds tick closer to doomsday, Pierce will realize he can truly trust no one—not the bewitching enigma who runs at his side or even those who are closest to him—for any one of them could be . . . a Judas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another avid reader fallen by the wayside. Was a huge Stephen King at one point but there were a couple of books I couldn't finish so I lost interest. Started on the Cell a couple of months ago but haven't finished it yet.

My all time favorite which translated into not one but two crummy made for TV movies is Salem's Lot. That was my first SK book and he scared the bejeesuz out of me. My favorite movie adaptation is The Dead Zone with Christopher Walken. I haven't read Dolores Claiborne but I thought that was a good movie. The Stand was one of my favorites also-the book, not the movie.

Toots - the Poisonwood Bible is an excellent book. I'm currently reading The Secret Lives of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd. I'm behind the times so it is probably old news to most, but I had never heard of it. I love how each chapter starts off with a little tidbit about honey bees. They are fascinating creatures.

Oooo - they just showed a commercial that the Mike and Juliet show is going to be debuting in Oklahoma City in September. :clap: I wish they'd have Clay back now that I can watch it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Toots

I've never read SK because I didn't think I would enjoy the subject. After reading how many of you like him, I thought maybe you could give me an idea of which book to start with. I'm a real panty waist when it comes to scary stuff. Just don't enjoy scary anytime, including in the movies, so be very gentle with me the first time. Tee Hee! :F_05BL17blowkiss: :bier:

I'm just loving all the suggestions and comments on books to read. I now have a long list to entertain me during the long winter. Books are so much fun! Keep those recommendations coming.

This is probably a long shot, but have any of you read "The Old Man Who Read Love Stories" by Luis Sepulveda? Just a short 131 pages long, written in Spanish and translated to English. It's a beautiful little story and well worth the read.

shieladownunder....I've read all of Kingsolver's novels but haven't read many of her non-fiction books. She's an excellent writer and spinner of yarns.

Edited by Toots

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Toots You might want to start with Carrie...it is a very short book and not too scary...this was the first book he ever wrote. Also; instead of jumping into the novels, maybe start with his story collections...Night Shift or Different Seasons...The Dark Tower Series isn't scary at all...just thought provoking; but it is 7 volumes. The Green Mile is excellent!

Just a few to get you started!

Sheliadownunder I had a heck of time getting through the Cell; seemed to me like SK just dashed this off to get something out there...really lacking in character development and I have to say it really bored me to tears and I have never been bored by anything he wrote.

Kim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm about halfway through "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close" by Jonathan Safran Foer and I'm fascinated by it. It's one of the most original and memorable book I've read in a long time. Highly recommend it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Toots You might want to start with Carrie...it is a very short book and not too scary...this was the first book he ever wrote. Also; instead of jumping into the novels, maybe start with his story collections...Night Shift or Different Seasons...The Dark Tower Series isn't scary at all...just thought provoking; but it is 7 volumes. The Green Mile is excellent!

Just a few to get you started!

Sheliadownunder I had a heck of time getting through the Cell; seemed to me like SK just dashed this off to get something out there...really lacking in character development and I have to say it really bored me to tears and I have never been bored by anything he wrote.

Kim

Is different season the one with apt pupil and the body? there is also the short novel the girl who loved tom gordon...

what scares you? do you like suspense at all? What about gory things...cos the stand for me is more thought provoking about our society and the idea of how man will survive such a disaster.

I just finished Blaze...a sweet book...and not scary at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Toots

Toots You might want to start with Carrie...it is a very short book and not too scary...this was the first book he ever wrote. Also; instead of jumping into the novels, maybe start with his story collections...Night Shift or Different Seasons...The Dark Tower Series isn't scary at all...just thought provoking; but it is 7 volumes. The Green Mile is excellent!

Just a few to get you started!

Sheliadownunder I had a heck of time getting through the Cell; seemed to me like SK just dashed this off to get something out there...really lacking in character development and I have to say it really bored me to tears and I have never been bored by anything he wrote.

Kim

Is different season the one with apt pupil and the body? there is also the short novel the girl who loved tom gordon...

what scares you? do you like suspense at all? What about gory things...cos the stand for me is more thought provoking about our society and the idea of how man will survive such a disaster.

I just finished Blaze...a sweet book...and not scary at all.

Ansa, I don't like a lot of suspense and little gore. I do like some mystery novels (Nelson DeMille, Daniel Silva) and I loved the Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns so some suspense and gore are o.k. My favorite books are those about real life (fiction) and the everyday people who live it. Ann Tyler is another of my favorite authors so that tells you a lot about my exciting reading habits.

I'm open to new reading experiences so I'll give SK a try. I'll let you all know what I think!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love all the discussion and book recommendations! I am still finishing up the 7th Dark Tower book by Stephen King right now (and I was one who kind of got disappointed and lost interest after a few of his more recents novels....From a Buick 8 comes to mind....don't think I ever finished that one) but the last 3 Dark Tower books have renewed my faith in his abilities as a writer! So I am looking forward to picking up Blaze this fall and reading it. Glad to hear you enjoyed it, ansa.

I loved the Kite Runner and am going to read the author's newest book when I get a chance. Have I recommended Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson yet? I know I've talked about it on main, but I should put a plug in here for it as well. Amazing, true story of a man who has made it his life's work to build co-ed schools in Pakistan & Afghanistan.

I plan to go through this thread and write down some of the recommendations, too. I like a wide variety of books, but the only ones I tend to buy and collect are Jeffery Deaver, Tami Hoag, Stephen King and of course the Harry Potter series. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Have I recommended Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson yet? I know I've talked about it on main, but I should put a plug in here for it as well. Amazing, true story of a man who has made it his life's work to build co-ed schools in Pakistan & Afghanistan.

I thoroughly enjyed that book also. It shows you how one person like Greg with sure determination and unwilling to let go of his dream can make a difference.

ETA one guilty pleasure book I came across this summer was Still Life with Crows. I had not heard of these writers before. What a page turner...not for the faint of heart! Here is a good write up, reviews and reader's comments.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearc...n=9780446612760

Edited by woo lovereyes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Toots

Three Cups of Tea is on my long list of books to read. I've heard nothing but good comments on the book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...