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#61: Eight years of freakishly fun tours...and yes, he's still the one!


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  1. 1. What should be the next thread title at FCA?

    • I'm not a regular drinker, but after every Clay concert I need something hard.
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    • So I'm a filty-mouthed degenerate, with the hots for a gay singer. I don't see a problem.
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    • I drank the koolaid and it was mighty fine.
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    • It is a good cult!
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    • I think that caused another kerfuffle.
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    • The Worst Bad Boys For You: The Ones That Only Look Non-Threatening
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School isn't too bad today...yet. Most of the questions are "how do I log in to the computer?" and "how do I print my syllabus?"

Cute Clay mention (via playbiller at the CH):

The View's Haristylist Talks Fall Trends

BellaSugar: In your 10 years on The View, what are a few of your favorite experiences and most memorable moments? (Both good and bad.)

Lavette Slater: There are so many funny and memorable moments on The View. I remember Clay Aiken coming to the show and expressing to me that his hair gets so flat on top and that he wanted height in his hair. Knowing that he didn't want his hair teased, and a simple blow-out wouldn't work without a wash, I proceeded to put rollers in the crown area of his head. He didn't mind, and somehow was the most secure and cool-looking guy wearing them, but I remember the executive producer coming in hair and makeup and saying, "What the . . . ?"

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I grew up in the segregated South and don't have any interest in watching glorifications of it. I'm glad those days are gone, and there's nothing close to entertainment value in it for me. To see how it really was, I recommend watching documentaries, such as Eyes on the Prize. There were whites-only everything in those days of hatred and ignorance -- restaurants, movie theaters, hotels, motels, bowling alleys, skating rinks, you name it. White and black people did not use the same restrooms, even at gas stations, or drink from the same water fountains in public places such as parks and zoos. People did not attend the same schools, or the same churches, much less live in the same neighborhoods. And I've been on city buses at a time when black people could only sit in the back. Black people could shop at Foley's department store downtown, but they could not eat at the lunch counter, and black children didn't sit on Santa's lap. There was nothing heart-warming about any of it. I recall during the 70's and the national debate over the Equal Rights Amendment, that it failed due to a big campaign from the Eagle Forum types who argued that this would force women and men to go to the same public restrooms. This struck me as beyond hypocritical since these were the same groups who had no problem in the 1950's with three bathrooms in public places --- Men, Ladies, and Colored. They didn't think it was so terrible that black men and women went to the same public restroom. I grew up with a ringside seat to this awfulness as a child, although, thankfully, I had enlightened, liberal parents.

In Houston in the 1950's and early 60's, my family often ate at a barbecue joint called The Lockwood Inn, owned by a black family in a black neighborhood. This place did a sizeable trade with the white community because they served the best pit barbecue in town. But, and here is what shocks me to this day, it was whites only dining room, and black patrons picked up barbecue to go from a window in the back. I was disgusted by that when I was eight years old, and I still have a hard time believing that people tolerated that stuff as long as they did.

I still bristle when I hear something like, "Give that to the black lady," or black woman or man. I heard someone in a store not that long ago tell his child, "Go ask the colored lady." I said, "You mean the lady in the green dress?" It pisses me off. The South has greatly benefited from interracial marriages -- of all kind. I know some people whose opinions changed dramatically with the arrival of a mixed-race grandchild. As John Lennon wrote in "Mind Games" -- Love is the answer, and you know that, for sure!

I highly recommend the following linked documentary that develops into a study of the work, and ultimate murder, of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. It's free to watch, and is educational beyond anything taught in any school. It is two hours in length and full of stuff you don't know and wonder why you don't. It begins, the first 8 or 9 minutes, with pictures of men hanged, and video of some of the violence of the struggle for civil rights, and the unbelievably despicable behavior of bigots, which is hard to watch but necessary to the subject. I've watched this several times and each time I get more out of it. In light of the dedication of the Martin Luther King, Jr., National Memorial in Washington later this week, I think it's extremely timely. It's hard to get the truth told in this country. It's called "Evidence of Revision" -- because there it is in black and white, no pun intended, but there it is. You may be shocked, but the whole world needs to see this.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4920540616782600949

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I'm baaaaaack! :) Didja miss me? LOL

We are..... semi-settled. We got all our big stuff in, we got our phone and internet working (had to get 2 phone jacks installed and that was done today), next is the TV, we need to call Dish to get set up and installed. Mom's bed is put together, mine needs to be done. Nothing in my room is really done except my dressers. My bathtub needs re-caulking before I can use it, the sink cupboards and drawers need a little cleaning and some paint.

Went to take a shower today and found out we have no hot water. We had to get a plug put in so we could have our electric stove and we think the gas got shut off when that pipe was lowered and we happened to have just enough hot water for yesterday and so we have none today.

I put together the hutch last night, Mom got the kitchen cupboards done. I don't think we'll end up being able to make a trip out to get more stuff tonight, it's so late already and we easily spent 2 1/2 hours out there yesterday; it's over an hour drive one way. We still have to bring stuff from our pantry, the kitchen cupboards, the linen closet, Mom's bedroom and then there's still things in both bathrooms. Then there's a small storage across the lot and a rented storage down the road that needs to be cleaned out too.

One thing I can't wait for is the trip to IKEA. I'm getting a desk! I CAN NOT wait! Right now we're looking at maybe September 17th for that.

I feel like I have a lot to catch up on, even though I know I really don't. Guess I should go read around anyway. :)

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Couchie, I loved your perspective. It makes a lot of sense to me. I have not read the book, but saw the movie, and liked it. I also saw the movie as one woman's perspective, and not as a historical novel. My maternal grandmother worked ironing peoples clothes when she first came to the United States. She was paid 50 cents a day, and she ironed all day. Being Hispanic and poor in Texas was not a good thing. Although there was no segregation for Hispanics, there was definitely DE-facto segregation because of economics. We lived in our own section, and all the schools I went to were 100 per cent Hispanic. Black kids had their own school which was both a grammar school and high school. That was back before Brown versus Board of Education, Topeka reversed Plessy v Ferguson. And even when it was reversed it took a couple of years for the schools to comply.

Cute story about my 27 year old granddaughter. I had come to Houston to help with her newborn brother. The next door neighbor had driven her to her first grade class, and brought her home. She was five years old, and I could tell that she had been crying. It seems that there was a little boy who had been hitting her. The neighbor whispered in my ear that he was black. Then the neighbor told my granddaughter, "tell your grandma what happened to you." Granddaughter related the story that a boy was picking on her and made her cry. Then the neighbor told her, "tell your grandmother what color the boy was." My granddaughter had this puzzled look on her face, then she answered, "a regular color."

I was so proud of that little girl that day!

I am going to see if I can find that book, "I'm Done" so I can read it.

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:yeahthat: to Couchie's post about The Help (including the vampire stuff - thought the girl in the Twilight series was as exciting as dry toast). I enjoyed reading the book and look forward to seeing the movie, although I will say that I don't find most films as good as the books. One exception would be To Kill a Mockingbird. Loved both the film and the book. I'm not sure if I'll see this movie in the theater though. Other than the Harry Potter series and the Narnia movies, I very rarely go out to the movies. Last exception was The King's Speech, which I loved.

And it does annoy me that every movie that depicts a certain point in history is supposed to represent everything that happened during that time. I didn't know about the controversy with the book but I'm not sure if it would have affected my viewpoint of the novel. Might have possibly affected my opinion of the author but without knowing more, I wouldn't want to make a blanket statement.

I don't have a problem with anyone not going to the movie or not enjoying it as long as they don't think everyone should feel the same way. And I'm kind of like Jamar in that I don't like to judge something based solely on someone else's opinion. And keepingfaith, I'm not sure I get what you are saying about not wanting to get entertainment from something that you had previous experiences of, if only as an observer. Most of us do that all of the time. We read and watch books or movies about things like the Holocaust or abuses during the Civil Rights era or killings, etc. all the time. Now I'm not saying that we are sitting there cheering and laughing about others pain, but there has to be some entertainment value or we wouldn't be watching them. They make me feel and think, and for me, that is entertaining. And sometimes it even makes people act to make things better when they see or read about these atrocities, even if they were meant primarily as entertainment. I remember when Saving Private Ryan came out in theaters, and one night we went to see it and we saw several men there who had served in the war. And seeing the movie was like a catharsis for some of them, and a way for them to let others share in what they had experienced that day. Hopefully no one saw that movie and complained that it didn't show the atrocities of the millions of people who were slaughtered because it was not meant to convey the entire WWII experience.

As far as people saying the colored person or the black person, etc., I don't get offended unless their attitude or tone is negative. My dad is 76 years old and he still says colored people because that is what he grew up with, however for a 76 year old white man, he's probably one of the least prejudiced people that I've known. He's coached junior league basketball for probably 50 years and sees the kids as individuals, not as an ethnicity or a gender.

And there have been times when I've said to take it to the fill in the blank lady/man or something similar because if you don't know the people, sometimes you go with whatever descriptive term is most apparent. If I'm in a room full of blacks, and I was wanted to point out a white guy, I'd say the white guy with the bald head or something like that. It has nothing to do with prejudice. It's part of the description. If everyone is the same color, you'd try to find something else that stood out, like the tall one or the fat one or whatever.

This is what happens when I don't post for awhile. I wind up writing a column. Sorry about that.

And I had a pretty good weekend. My dad has reunions every year where his kids and families, and my stepmom's kids and families all get together. I normally couldn't go because I worked, and for the last several years didn't want to anyway because I had taken a break from most of my family. Well I've started getting back in touch with my sisters (although slowly because I don't want to get sucked back into the vortex of dysfunction) so most of the family was there. Got to hold my two great-nieces or whatever they are. Once I get past the cousin or niece stage, I'm lost on the titles. Both are only a couple of months old and so beautiful, and the one is 2 years old and is gorgeous. And besides that, I had lots of good food to eat.

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I worked all weekend except for one brief trip to the marina for a walk. And it will be another busy week for me. But I'm hoping to take a couple of trips before this year is up so I don't mind. And I want to 2012 to be a lot better so I'm willing to put in the work now.

Lucky, your weekend cracked me up. Your life used to be my life heee.

To all the teachers, librarians and students... have fun with back to school week. My mom loses one kid tomorrow and the other one on Monday as they head back to school.

For the past couple of weeks I've been listening to a lot of Clay. It's actually been awhile. The voice still moves me like few can.

I grew up with a ringside seat to this awfulness as a child, although, thankfully, I had enlightened, liberal parents.

Hey Keepingfaith,

I respect your position. I think we are all the way we are because of our experiences and the experiences of those that raised us, and the times and place where it all happened.

I highlighted the above because I would hate for anyone to believe that there were NO liberal enlightened people that lived in the south. Some people I know to this day are living in the past and want nothing to do with people that aren't black and would die if their child married someone that wasn't black. Everyone is painted with one broad brush. I have relatives who would not believe that your parents were enlightened; that as soon as you got behind a closed door another face would show. I find it awful that my mom has to deal with relatives that have nasty things to say about our rainbow coalition family. They don't speak to it directly but indirectly. They are no blacker than me. So I have experience on the other end of the spectrum where despite seeing loving family members who are not black added to the family, the attitude is still a closed heart. Intermarriage doesn't solve the problem for everyone. Also reminds me of what Fear said about people she knows loving the woman who took care of them but that didn't spread to others. It's sad really.

We have these conversations all the time and I'm living with a mom who is a living history as she grew up in the DEEP South with the nearest large town hundreds of miles away. It has one main road and the population decreases with every census. In 2000 the population of her home town was 2425. 80% black. 18% white. The medium income was less than 20K. We were just talking about her school experiences the other day. She fled the south at the age of 19 and by the time she was 22 she was living in a predominantly white California town with a husband and 2 kids. We moved to Oakland a few years later to a black community but our church was mostly white and most of my social activities took place there. I think the 50 years of experiences since my mom left the south explains why I am the way I am. My mom's sister's experiences were far different from hers.

With regards to The Help, I have no problem believing there were Skeeters in the world in 1960. There just weren't enough of them. Still haven't seen the movie but in the book I don't remember reading a glorified south where everyone was content with their lives and the white people weren't racist. If that's the movie then yeah I'll have a problem with it but a 2 hour movie can not tell a complete story and I don't expect it to. There are people in my family that will not go see it if paid. But eh, you couldn't pay me to see some of the things they find fascinating especially on the black comedy front.

I totally agree on Eyes on the Prize. I've read the book and I've seen the documentary - parts 1 and 2 - multiple times. I don't recommend anyone watching one thing thinking it will tell them everything. It's a breadth of material that tells the story. Right now along with my trashy historical fiction I'm back to absorbing everything about The Middle Passage - every perspective I can find, the enslaved, the slave master, the merchants, the rulers in America, Europe and Africa. Slavery didn't happen in a vacuum and I need to understand the period, the mindset of all involved. The 70s is also a fascinating period for me because I was old enough to remember a lot of it which took place in my own backyard. Honestly there's nothing that would shock me about black history or any other kind of history. Almost every group in this country had their own special kind of hell.

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I need to get to bed but wanted to respond to the one line of your post Couchie, about almost every group in America, or practically any place for that matter, having their own special kind of hell. I think about what my mom had to go through when she moved here from Germany and it couldn't have been easy. She came over with my dad sometime in the 50's when I'm sure many people did not want to have anything to do with the Germans. Even though she had been just a kid when WWII happened and had seen far worse than what most American's had, she probably was still hated because of what they thought she represented. Her childhood was horrible and she saw friends blown up with their body parts in the trees. I can't even imagine what she went through.

I've been reading a lot lately, and a lot is historical fiction or real life stories. I've gotten into them because I feel like I'm learning something at the same time as being entertained, even when I'm being horrified by what happened. One of the books I recently read was about a Chinese boy, then man, who lived during WWII and after, and how many of the Chinese separated themselves from the Japanese to protect themselves. However he fell for a Japanese girl who later got sent to an internment camp and how the lives they had known and built for themselves were taken from them. It was called Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet. I've already requested I'm Gone from the library after you mentioned it because when I checked it out at Amazon, it sounded like something that I'd enjoy. I love finding out about people's lives and experiences. Wars and politics, not so much, other than how they affect the people.

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:GM_FCA:

60 Days until The Gala!Yahoo.gif

Happy Birthday to all celebrating!

Everyone have a great day!

Kim

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And keepingfaith, I'm not sure I get what you are saying about not wanting to get entertainment from something that you had previous experiences of, if only as an observer. Most of us do that all of the time. We read and watch books or movies about things like the Holocaust or abuses during the Civil Rights era or killings, etc. all the time. Now I'm not saying that we are sitting there cheering and laughing about others pain, but there has to be some entertainment value or we wouldn't be watching them. They make me feel and think, and for me, that is entertaining. And sometimes it even makes people act to make things better when they see or read about these atrocities, even if they were meant primarily as entertainment.

I'm just saying what I feel and think. I had a very emotional experience with Schindler's List - and it took me weeks to get it out of my head, which is not a bad thing. For me it wasn't entertainment; it was more important than that. I didn't like Saving Private Ryan at all, so it's just subjective, you know. My dad didn't see Private Ryan because it was still too fresh for him after 50+ years. He's a 91 year old former Marine, and he still doesn't like to talk about what happened in WWII. At the other end of the spectrum, my dad refused to watch John Wayne war movies, because he said they were fairy tales that gave people the wrong idea about the realities of war.

Propaganda is all around us, and we live in it and drink it up for the most part. But when I can clearly identify it, I reject it. That doesn't mean I expect other people to reject it. But, I'll always speak my mind, and hope that others don't object to that.

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How's our East Coast members doing after the earthquake a few minutes ago? Epicenter was somewhere in Virginia, not far from DC.

And I just read that Colorado had an earthquake last night as well. What in the world is going on?

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And keepingfaith, I'm not sure I get what you are saying about not wanting to get entertainment from something that you had previous experiences of, if only as an observer. Most of us do that all of the time. We read and watch books or movies about things like the Holocaust or abuses during the Civil Rights era or killings, etc. all the time. Now I'm not saying that we are sitting there cheering and laughing about others pain, but there has to be some entertainment value or we wouldn't be watching them. They make me feel and think, and for me, that is entertaining. And sometimes it even makes people act to make things better when they see or read about these atrocities, even if they were meant primarily as entertainment.

I'm just saying what I feel and think. I had a very emotional experience with Schindler's List - and it took me weeks to get it out of my head, which is not a bad thing. For me it wasn't entertainment; it was more important than that. I didn't like Saving Private Ryan at all, so it's just subjective, you know. My dad didn't see Private Ryan because it was still too fresh for him after 50+ years. He's a 91 year old former Marine, and he still doesn't like to talk about what happened in WWII. At the other end of the spectrum, my dad refused to watch John Wayne war movies, because he said they were fairy tales that gave people the wrong idea about the realities of war.

Propaganda is all around us, and we live in it and drink it up for the most part. But when I can clearly identify it, I reject it. That doesn't mean I expect other people to reject it. But, I'll always speak my mind, and hope that others don't object to that.

My dad who served in active combat in World War II felt the same way as your dad. He said that movies, TV shows, glorified wars, and the reality was way worse. He also would not talk about what happened in WWII. One thing he did say is that people behave horribly in wars, not just the enemy, but American soldiers as well. He said he saw horrible deeds performed both by the enemy and American soldiers. But he would not go into details. He was a gentle man. He died last year at the age of 94.

I guess war brings out some people's "Heart of Darkness."

I did not see Private Ryan. War movies are way too graphic for me. I do not watch them. I like war movies such as "From Here To Eternity." especially the scene on the beach. heh I also liked Tora, Tora. But those are old movies and not too graphic.

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I'm pretty far from the epicenter but it was a strong rocking motion. We've had a few small ones in Winston-Salem before but they were more like a loud bang, this one went on for a while as it's intensity built. I was sitting down and my chair was vibrating like crazy. Mr. Fear slept through it. :cryingwlaughter: No damage that I could see in the house.

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My Dad was born a few years after his uncle went down on the Titanic and he could never see any movies about it. He remembered his mother talking about the tragedy!

My favourite movie is Shirley Valentine.......cos every woman needs to run away sometimes!

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My Dad was born a few years after his uncle went down on the Titanic and he could never see any movies about it. He remembered his mother talking about the tragedy!

My favourite movie is Shirley Valentine.......cos every woman needs to run away sometimes!

It's so interesting to watch the news and see other people's reaction to an earthquake. We're so nonchalant about them in California. I think in my lifetime only 2 have really scare me. Glad to see there doesn't appear to be loss of life.

KF... I love strong opinionated people and people with conviction. That's you on both fronts.

So did anyone else watch The Social Network? I don't know anything about the real Zuckerberg but the actor's portrayal is fascinating.

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That earthquake was freaky. When I first felt my chair begin to shake, I looked outside to see if there were tanks or something out there. Never expected to experience an earthquake. Can't say I really panicked because luckily it didn't know things off the wall here or do any damage but it was unnerving. And that crap about animals being able to predict earthquakes is hogwash. My dogs didn't wake up from their naps until the house was shaking.

I'm not sure about how I feel towards movies that are relevant to me. I think for the most part, I kind of like seeing shows or listening to music or reading about issues that affect me, partly because it's cathartic. I don't usually talk about things that have affected me deeply, or I brush over them because I don't want sympathy and I certainly don't want to be defined by those things. So one way for me to deal with some of that crap is through other outlets. Also, watching, listening, or reading about those issues helps me understand things better.

There was one show, I think a piece that Diane Sawyer did, about child abuse that was hard for me to watch because it really mirrored my own situation. It involved more of the emotional abuse, which is what most of my situation had been. I think it did help because it was an acknowledgement that it was an unhealthy and abnormal situation. Still don't like to call it abuse because it makes me feel like a victim, but I know watching it hurt like hell and I felt so bad for those kids, and for the younger me. I'm still glad I watched it though. Made me feel stronger.

Haven't watched The Social Network but it is one of the movies I'd like to see. I heard the performances were great.

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That earthquake was freaky. When I first felt my chair begin to shake, I looked outside to see if there were tanks or something out there. Never expected to experience an earthquake. Can't say I really panicked because luckily it didn't know things off the wall here or do any damage but it was unnerving. And that crap about animals being able to predict earthquakes is hogwash. My dogs didn't wake up from their naps until the house was shaking.

LOL about the dogs.

Well it's 11:45 and we here in California just ended the day with, you guessed it, an earthquake. Guess we were jealous of the east coast. It gave me a start more than most.

Sounds like we have some things in common Justclay.

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:GM_FCA:

59 Days until The Gala!Yahoo.gif

Happy Birthday to all celebrating!

Everyone have a great day!

Kim

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:GM_FCA:

The earthquake vibrations in the Triad were definitely an unexpected and new experience. I was sitting on my sofa finishing getting ready to go teach at the academy, and I could have sworn someone had put in a quarter to make it vibrate, a la the movie "Bonneville." :cryingwlaughter:

But I hear you, Couchie and other Californians. My friend Sally, who for years lived in San Francisco, said this was nothing. The quake did damage the Washington Monument and National Cathedral, and that's a huge shame.

The new Carolina blog features SueReu's "Where Do I Begin, Love Story Theme" montage and Shamrock's dumpster diving recap, complete with pix. I know you have seen both, but I hope you will drop by and give both kudos in print. SueRue sent me screen caps from her montage. Three are up, and I may add two more.

I was very excited that Shamrock gave me permission to use her story. Hopefully, her experience will inspire others to be creative in their power code collecting. Thank you to those who have already been by! :wub:

Scarlett and I had another Online Power Vote Party; and this, too, is in the blog. In 30 minutes, we cast 965 votes.

YelCap2b.jpg

My daughter caught the power vote bug and PM'd me four codes via Facebook. She and the children are mostly vegetarians, drink soy milk, etc. The kids don't even know what a McDonald's Happy Meal is. So I asked her where she got the codes. Turns out she actually bought Pepsi and plans to buy some more. :)

Have a great day, all! :snoopy:

Caro :listen:

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:GM_FCA:

58 Days until The Gala!Yahoo.gif

Happy Birthday to all celebrating!

Everyone have a great day!

Kim

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:GM_FCA:

Tweet last night that Clay was at a production of "Violet" in North Carolina; Lauren Kennedy is in the production. The tweeter also mentioned there was an emmy award winner there too..not sure who the person was or if the person was with Clay.

57 Days until The Gala!Yahoo.gif

Happy Birthday to all celebrating!

Everyone have a great day!

Kim

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Good morning! It's very quiet in the Clay world but we have enough natural disasters to keep us busy. Although it won't affect us, I hope everyone in Irene's path stays safe and has no damage to home and property. I can only think of jmh, who I hope is doing well but maybe busy in a good way.

I'm hoping Clay is getting bored with the quiet life and is ready to make his appearance soon. At least in 2012.

Keep voting for the National Inclusion Project. So near but yet so far. Hopefully you all drink Pepsi and can do some power voting too. Facebook voting and texting are also so easy to do.

Have a great day, I hear Mr. Fear stirring this morning.

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I know the answer is probably no, but is there anything Canadians can do this time around with the Pepsi voting? I sure don't drink the stuff but if there is another way I can help let me know.

I am about ready to hear Clay's voice live again. It is going to be hard to miss gala this year. I wish they would consider streaming it live as was mentioned in the video chat with Clay. Otherwise, I am thankful to any and all clack gatherers!

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Good morning! It's very quiet in the Clay world but we have enough natural disasters to keep us busy. Although it won't affect us, I hope everyone in Irene's path stays safe and has no damage to home and property. I can only think of jmh, who I hope is doing well but maybe busy in a good way.

Thanks for thinking of me. I am busy in a good way, and Irene isn't going to make it to us beyond a little rain.

I hope Mr. Fear is recovering well, but not so well that he starts doing things he shouldn't. :cryingwlaughter:

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